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Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence Literacy

As the capabilities of AI advance, it's important for us to develop AI literacy. That is, to develop the skills needed to navigate a world where AI is commonplace.  AI literacy can be defined as "a set of competencies that enables individuals to critically evaluate AI technologies; communicate and collaborate effectively with AI; and use AI as a tool online, at home, and in the workplace."​​​​​​ (Long & Magerko, 2020). 

 

Sources:

Duri Long and Brian Magerko, "What Is AI Literacy? Competencies and Design Considerations," Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2020, https://doi.org/10.1145/3313831.3376727

Critically Thinking About AI

Research the AI tool you are using.

  • Does this tool have access to current information? Or does it have a knowledge cutoff date?
  • What kind of data was it trained on? How might this impact its responses? 
  • What are its data policies? Are there any privacy risks to consider?
  • What can (and can't) this tool do? What are its capabilities and limitations? 
  • How often is this AI tool updated?

Evaluate its responses.

Just because AI can generate answers that sound good doesn't mean it's generating answers that are accurate or truthful. Take time to evaluate and fact-check the responses generated by AI. While AI can serve as a helpful tool, it doesn't compare to or replace human intelligence and critical thinking skills.  

The ROBOT test (created by and shared with the permission of McGill University librarians) can be used when reading about AI applications to help you assess the credibility of the technology.

Reliability

Objective

Bias

Ownership

Type


Reliability 

How reliable is the information available about the AI technology?

  • If it’s not produced by the party responsible for the AI, what are the author’s credentials? Bias?
  • If it is produced by the party responsible for the AI, how much information are they making available? 
    • Is information only partially available due to trade secrets?
    • How biased is they information that they produce?

Objective

  • What is the goal or objective of the use of AI?
  • What is the goal of sharing information about it?
    • To inform?
    • To convince?
    • To find financial support?

Bias

  • What could create bias in the AI technology?
  • Are there ethical issues associated with this?
  • Are bias or ethical issues acknowledged?
    • By the source of information?
    • By the party responsible for the AI?
    • By its users?

Owner

  • Who is the owner or developer of the AI technology?
  • Who is responsible for it?
    • Is it a private company?
    • The government?
    • A think tank or research group?
  • Who has access to it?
  • Who can use it?

Type

  • Which subtype of AI is it?
  • Is the technology theoretical or applied?
  • What kind of information system does it rely on?
  • Does it rely on human intervention? 

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

Sources:

Hervieux, S. & Wheatley, A. (2020). The ROBOT test [Evaluation tool]. The LibrAIry. https://thelibrairy.wordpress.com/2020/03/11/the-robot-test

AI Glossaries

AI Literacy Resources